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speaking up in difficult conversations

Appearing at the Policy Circle’s Leadership Summit in Chicago on September 7th, Melanie Sturm introduced the audience of female change agents to her “Six Powers of Persuasion.” Convened to learn how to obtain positions on boards and commissions — often male-dominated — that advise government agencies, the women learned from Melanie how to to persuasively and winsomely advance their ideas and policy prescriptions.

"Messaging That Works" Panel At Independent Women's Voice Donor Conference 

Appearing alongside Kellyanne Conway on a "Messaging That Works" panel, Melanie Sturm presents how to Engage to Win.

E2W presents AEi's Arthur brooks

Appearing at Engage to Win’s inaugural workshop in 2013, American Enterprise Institute President Arthur Brooks made several points that are at the core of our persuasion program, in particular, “the winning side always fights for people, not things!” Watch this portion of Arthur's talk for more of his keen insights.

Fairness and Compassion

This is Krista demonstrating how to appeal to the fairness and compassion instincts of people who think they disagree in order to lead them to common ground. Every issue can be framed this way. The question is how. This is what we teach at Engage to Win.

Identifying the Vulnerable

Because the winning side always fights for people, one key to persuasion is to identify the people who are adversely affected by bad policies or those who would be helped by good policies. The vulnerable are often our friends, family, neighbors, co-workers. Their stories help us convey the devastation caused by policies that purport to help people. Here is some footage of the audience interaction at our Steamboat Institute workshop on Aug 22, 2014.

The Pivot

Your 80% ally is not your 20% foe, so it is important to know how to pivot away from disagreement toward common ground. Here is Krista Kafer summarizing the E2W skill sets including the most advanced skill — pivoting to a better message.

Ask Clarifying Questions

In order to be listened to, you must be an engaged listener yourself. That’s how we earn the trust of the person we’re talking to. Here is some footage of the audience practicing the engaged listening skill we call “clarifying questions.”